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Brad
Reply with quote  #1 
Hi im new. To jumping can someone explain the boat paths . Not sure what it all means
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2feetwide
Reply with quote  #2 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad
Hi im new. To jumping can someone explain the boat paths . Not sure what it all means


Basically you can ask a driver to drive wherever you want in the course, so long as its in a relatively straight line. 

for example you may hear some skiers say 

"Split" aka "split em" aka "down the middle" means please drive down the middle of the boat course.

Narrow Split means please bump the boat guides on the observers side of the boat. (Closer To the ramp) 

Wide Split Means Please bump the boat guides on the drivers side oft the boat. (Further out from the ramp).

often you might find bigger jumpers might ask for slightly different paths for example, "2ftwide" which simply means please drive 2 feet wider than split. 

last but not least if its a raw begginer like only been over the ramp a couple of times they might go what is called and "collegiant Split" which means anywhere outside the course between the course and the ramp. 


at the end of the day Boat path is really a skiers preference. if you are confident going over the ramp and are doing single cuts standing up all your landings, Split should be spot on and you will find that is what majority of people ask for. 

If you are not standing up your landings consistently try moving the boat closer to the ramp. hope this helps

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EB
Reply with quote  #3 
Back in the Old Days, there wasn't anything for a jump course.  Then, the 45 foot buoy
came around, to help the driver with spacing.  Still was up to the driver to put the boat
more or less parallel to the ramp.  Later, along came the 60 foot spacing buoy, the 500'
cut-out buoy, and more buoys to mark a jump course.  Along with boat timing.

Later on, with video jumping measuring, the jump course now includes about as many
buoys as the slalom course.

At one time, there was a proposal for DSO jumping, where the boat would run by the ramp at angle, so that if you did a double-cut, the ramp was effectively wider.  And,
also a bit steeper.  DSO = Double Cut Straight Over.  And, there also was left-hand or
Texas jumping,where the boat ran on the other side of the ramp.  We had quite a few lefties back in the Eastern Region, including at least one National Champion.

Advice:  if you are a beginner jumper, and not competing in a tournament, a good
driver can help you to learn to go over and ride away.
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EB
Reply with quote  #4 
Back in the Old Days, there wasn't anything for a jump course.  Then, the 45 foot buoy
came around, to help the driver with spacing.  Still was up to the driver to put the boat
more or less parallel to the ramp.  Later, along came the 60 foot spacing buoy, the 500'
cut-out buoy, and more buoys to mark a jump course.  Along with boat timing.

Later on, with video jumping measuring, the jump course now includes about as many
buoys as the slalom course.

At one time, there was a proposal for DSO jumping, where the boat would run by the ramp at an angle, so that if you did a double-cut, the ramp was effectively wider.  And,
also a bit steeper.  DSO = Double Cut Straight Over.  And, there also was left-hand or
Texas jumping,where the boat ran on the other side of the ramp.  We had quite a few lefties back in the Eastern Region, including at least one National Champion.

Advice:  if you are a beginner jumper, and not competing in a tournament, a good
driver can help you to learn to go over and ride away.
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EB
Reply with quote  #5 
Apologies for the double-post.  Tried to kill it, but failed.
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driver
Reply with quote  #6 
2feetwide, is there any rule or restriction to asking the driver for " start narrow, finish wide"  i.e. driver bumps the left (observer) entrance buoy & then bumps the driver side buoy on the exit end? seems like some drivers may be too concerned about a straight path rather than counter steering for the jumper's pull & that path should help.  
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That sounds crazy
Reply with quote  #7 
I don't know any jumper who doesn't want a straight path, and any good driver is going to counter steer just fine.  Seems like this is overthinking it a bit.
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EB
Reply with quote  #8 

Here are the pertinent Rules about boat path:

Rules Governing Boat Path in Jumping

World Rule

13.08a: Boat Path

The jumper shall tell the boat driver at which distance and at what speed to pass the ramp, and the

boat shall follow a straight path through the jump course at the specified distance from the righthand

side of the ramp.

A centre line video on the jump course will be required for World, Confederation and Elite events

tournaments. Tapes will be submitted to and monitored by the Confederation Council.

 

AWSA Rule

9.07 Boat Path

The jumper shall tell the boat driver at what off-set distance to pass the ramp. The boat shall follow a straight path parallel to the course through the EC buoys. The driver shall not deviate the boat path in an attempt to aid the skier’s landing and rideout of the jump.

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driver
Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks EB. 
 the key word being "parallel" to the course clarifies everything. & yes any "good" driver will counter steer enough & hold the path. 
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EB
Reply with quote  #10 
Of course, starting with a brand-new novice taking their first ride-overs, there are some
techniques that I've seen.  One is driving past at an angle, going left-right, so the novice
jumper just chips over a bit of the ramp, going only 1/3 to 1/2 way up.

Another way is for the driver to drive in, so that as a skier drifts back toward the wake,
they are going more or less straight up the ramp, rather than getting pulled to the side.
Key to control the path and spacing, so the skier doesn't land right on the crest of the wake.

I think that some of the most challenging times are when the skier isn't carrying very
much of a cut, and has nearly nil tension in the towline while in the air.  Like in the
range of 60 to 90 foot distances.

These days, it looks like ski schools tend to teach an aggressive single cut, to generate
some speed relative to the boat and consequent tension.  At speeds initially slower than
division max. speeds.  Although, I saw Freddy go 170' once on a single cut, where
there was a prize involved.

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another
Reply with quote  #11 
best method i saw, when beginners are having trouble riding out, and only done by a good driver, is to drive close to ramp, and then hard left turn so that the skier comes off the ramp and is directly behind the boat, if that makes sense.  It maintains a pull throughout the jump and ride out.  Watch the anchor lines though.
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there is only one way
Reply with quote  #12 
narrow , balls flat out , the Fittzy way ! 
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EB
Reply with quote  #13 

Suyderhoud your cut, and Grimditch your spring.
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